Classical:NEXT

CLASSICAL:NEXT 2019 IN ROTTERDAM

 

CLASSICAL:NEXT 2019 IN ROTTERDAM

 

The 2019 edition of Classical:NEXT, entitled "21st Century Polyphony: More Voices, Greater Symphonies" offers a platform to those whose parts are not yet known, not yet written or not yet recognized. As in music, the more voices that are heard and accepted across the industry, the more vivid the color, the deeper the texture and the greater the harmony.

The mission of Classical:NEXT is to unify the global classical and art music scene, enabling it to work better together. Its focus is on innovation, increasing relevance and effectiveness in both business and creative aspects of the industry.

 

 

Higher Education Pre-Conference Sessions

As a new addition at Classical:NEXT 2019, Higher Music Education is holding a Pre-Conference on May 15 from 14:00 to 18:30 in cooperation with the AEC (the European Association of Music HEIs). Sessions are open to all Classical:NEXT delegates.  

 

 

May 15, 2019 - Van Beuningen Zaal, De Doelen, Rotterdam, Netherlands

NEW PERFORMERS, NEW PERFORMANCES
Enabling mutual change for higher education and the industry

Goal of sessions. A strong and secure future for classical music requires that higher education and the industry combine their knowledge and collaborate to respectively train and employ musicians who are change agents, ready to meet the present and future challenges of the field. These sessions seek to provide those elements of change and the tools, steps and exact methodologies to effect change.

Session 1: 14:00 to 15:30 

Overview of the Pre-Conference Session 
Presenter: David Bahanovich

Presentation of three case studies where change has been enabled

Q&A, discussion and input from group on potential outcomes from the day

Session 2: 15:45 to 17:15

Participants are split into several working groups of up to ten people each. Each group ideally should have representatives from higher education, orchestra/ensembles, and the industry.

Group co-design/co-create a model or models for higher education that reflects the needs of industry.

The groups then come together to identify commonalities and differences in the models, and to reconcile differences.

Session 3: 17:30 to 18:30 

Workshop to create actionable items on how to enable changes contemplated in Session 2. 

Participants are split into multiple groups, each taking one or a few changes to create action steps for implementation using case studies as points of reference.

Reconvene participants, report-out and summation

 

In the addition to the pre-conference sessions, we draw your attention to these session taking place on subsequent days.


Higher Education Network Meeting within Classical:NEXT main programme 

Thursday, 16.05., 12:15-13:00, Van Weelde Zaal, De Doelen, Rotterdam, Netherlands  

Chair – John Kieser, New World Symphony, Miami 

A strong and secure future for classical music requires that higher education and the industry combine their knowledge and collaborate to respectively train and employ musicians who are change agents, ready to meet the present and future challenges of the field. This session, in cooperation with the Association Européene des Conservatoires, Académies de Musique et Musikhochschulen, will summarize the outcomes of the pre-conference session of May 15, and further discuss what tools, steps and exact methodologies are needed to effect change.”

 

 

Classical:NEXT main programme, conference session 

Thursday, 16.05, 16:00 - 17:00, Van Rijckevorsel Zaal, Conference Room 3, De Doelen, Rotterdam, Netherlands. 

Chair – David Bahanovich, Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music & Dance, Greenwich 

They don't teach you that at the conservatoire? Come Build a 21st c. Conservatoire 

“Musicians have always had to hustle, but there's never been a time when it mattered more than today, as dwindling institutional support makes a performing career a risky proposition and countless opportunities for innovation are seized primarily by those with the means to exploit them. Conservatoires have historically been very good at teaching people to play music, and very bad at teaching people how to thrive in the music business. Our panel of experts have built successful post-conservatoire businesses, making mistakes and learning hard lessons along the way. / We invite CN participants to join us as we explore the lessons learned and engage in a small group workshop and together craft the curriculum for the 21st c. conservatoire. What should students be able to do? What would a scaffold of a curriculum look like? How should industries engage with conservatoires? Should conservatoires be centres of R&D?”

 

Higher Education Organizing Partners

 

Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music & Dance
USC Thornton School of Music
Royal College of Music
Koninklijk Conservatorium den Haag (Royal Conservatoire, The Hague)